How to prevent your data from being searched at the U.S. border

How to prevent your data from being searched at the U.S. border

During the past two years, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol has targeted ever larger numbers of travelers' smartphones and laptops for searches as they

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During the past two years, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol has targeted ever larger numbers of travelers’ smartphones and laptops for searches as they cross the border into the country.

U.S. courts have generally upheld a so-called border search exception to the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment, allowing CBP to search electronic devices without a court-ordered warrant. In April, a group of lawmakers introduced legislation to require warrants to search devices owned by U.S. citizens and other legal residents, but for now, the law allows for warrantless device searches.

It’s worth noting, however, that the odds of CBP searching any single traveler’s device are tiny, although they may increase if the traveler fits certain profiles. Even with increased device searches during the past two years, CBP still only checks the devices of a fraction of 1 percent of all people crossing the U.S. border.

Still, travelers concerned about their privacy can take steps to protect their data as they cross the U.S. border. They should remember the old Boy Scout motto: Be prepared.

The best way to avoid sharing personal or confidential information with CBP agents as you cross the border is to scrub your devices before you travel, some privacy experts say.

While it’s difficult to fight a CBP search when you’re being questioned, there’s no requirement that your smartphone or laptop be loaded up with your data. Consider removing sensitive data from your devices by storing it in the cloud or on another device that stays home. 

“People should never lie to a CBP agent,” said Esha Bhandari, a staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project “If they’re asked a question, they should answer truthfully. But there’s no requirement you carry your data with you when you cross the border.”

If you don’t want CBP searching your work email, consider temporarily removing your email app from your smartphone. A cursory CBP search of your phone isn’t likely to discover what apps you’ve recently removed.

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