ibVPN review: A no-frills VPN with everything you need

ibVPN review: A no-frills VPN with everything you need

ibVPN in brief:P2P allowed: Yes Business location: Târgu Mureș,Romania Number of servers: 180+ Number of country locations: 50 Cost: $37 (Standard) /

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ibVPN in brief:

  • P2P allowed: Yes
  • Business location: Târgu Mureș,Romania
  • Number of servers: 180+
  • Number of country locations: 50
  • Cost: $37 (Standard) / $58 (Ultimate)
  • VPN protocol: IPSec (default)
  • Data encryption: AES-256 
  • Data authentication: HMAC-SHA2-256
  • Handshake encryption:  DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384

Romania-based ibVPN (Invisible Browsing VPN) does not have a beautiful app. It looks a little dated, in fact. Despite that, however, I found it surprisingly easy to use and very helpful.

I’d never heard of ibVPN until its publicity people contacted me requesting a review and asking how much it would cost. Sadly, it’s becoming quite common for press representatives to expect to pay for coverage. No money changed hands for this review, however. As with every other VPN reviewed on this site, I received a test account to try the service and then wrote this review.

Note: This review is part of our best VPNs roundup. Go there for details about competing products and how we tested them.

ibvpndashboard IDG

When you first jump into ibVPN for Windows, you get a single-panel interface with the default dashboard as your starting point. From here you can see whether you’re connected to a VPN, the protocol you’re using, whether a few of the extra services are on or off, a bandwidth graph, and the current status of your account.

There are two ways to navigate the app. You can either click on the various categories in the left rail; or for certain items, just select the links within the dashboard itself.

Clicking on the link for the Location heading at the top of the dashboard, for example, opens the app’s second panel to reveal all the server choices. You could accomplish the same thing by clicking Servers on the left rail.

That’s what I mean when I say the app is helpful. It offers two methods of accomplishing the same thing, which can sometimes make an app cumbersome. In this case, however, it’s catering to two different ways of understanding how the app should work, and that’s a good thing.

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