Open door policy

Open door policy

This server room is getting keycard access to make sure only those on the approved list are allowed to enter, reports a pilot fish on the scene."A car

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This server room is getting keycard access to make sure only those on the approved list are allowed to enter, reports a pilot fish on the scene.

“A card reader is installed on the outside of the door to get in,” fish says. “But how to handle exiting the room? Someone has the bright idea that a system administrator inside the server room might have their hands full when they’re trying to leave.

“So a motion sensor is installed on the inside, looking down on the doorway. That way, if someone walks up to the door from the inside, it will automatically unlock.

“But whoever created this system is a much more trusting soul than one of the sysadmins, who looks over the already installed system and sees the flaw.

“The sysadmin grabs the big boss for a demonstration. From outside the room, sysadmin slides a blank piece of paper under the door. The motion sensor detects the paper, cha-chick! goes the lock, and they waltz into the server room without a keycard.

“And the motion sensor is quickly replaced with a large push-button to exit the server room.”

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