What to expect from the Trump administration on cybersecurity

What to expect from the Trump administration on cybersecurity

Look for U.S. President Donald Trump's administration to push for increased cybersecurity spending in government, but also for increased digital surve

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Look for U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration to push for increased cybersecurity spending in government, but also for increased digital surveillance and encryption workarounds.

That’s the view of some cybersecurity policy experts, who said they expect Trump to focus on improving U.S. agencies’ cybersecurity while shying away from new cybersecurity regulations for businesses. 

Trump is likely to look for ways for the National Security Agency and other agencies to assist the government and companies defend against cyberattacks, said Jeffrey Eisenach, a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and a tech advisor during Trump’s presidential transition.

“Cyber has to be top of mind for any view of the United States’ global strategy,” Eisenach said Wednesday during a discussion about Trump’s cybersecurity priorities. “If you’re not thinking of cyber first, I don’t know what you should be thinking about.”

A proposed executive order from Trump on cybersecurity was leaked in January, but its formal release was postponed. Beyond the leaked drafts, it’s difficult to read the tea leaves of a Trump cyber policy, other cybersecurity experts said. 

Given Trump’s focus on fighting terrorism during his presidential campaign, he’s likely to push for greater surveillance powers, said Adam Klein, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security. A foreign surveillance provision in U.S. law is set to expire at the end of the year, and Klein expects the Trump team to push for unfettered reauthorization.

Trump “campaigned on vigorous counterterrorism efforts, and that is likely to lead [his] approach on surveillance and privacy issues,” Klein said. Trump may move away from former President Barack Obama’s attempts to balance privacy and national security, he said. 

The Department of Homeland Security has already talked about demanding social media passwords during border searches, Klein said. While he said he doubts the searches will happen, the discussion “suggests we’re in a new era here,” he added.

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